Coworking is not regulated by a state`s real estate commission, mainly because it doesn`t have the longer contracts and significant upfront costs, often related to traditional rental contracts. For both a landlord and a tenant, the coworking space presents a much lower risk than traditional offices, where a person late in the agreement leaves the room without a long and lengthy legal procedure. It also means that tenants don`t need to work with a licensed broker when researching, negotiating, and moving to a flexible workspace. However, because coworking is inherently dynamic and flexible, many operators will offer tenants longer-term leases if they put this stability ahead of the agility of short-term agreements. Like most aspects of coworking and the flexibility of the office industry as a whole, there are viable alternatives for almost every possible problem when a person knows where to look. While co-sharing agreements are becoming increasingly popular, it is clear that a number of legal issues need to be carefully considered during the negotiation phase of both licensing and leasing agreements. Licensors and licensees must consider their business plans and needs before entering into either of the two forms of contract. In a co-sharing agreement, utilities are shared by all users and individual users have little or no control over the management of buildings or the communication systems used. . . .