The General Court found that the wording of clause 2.B does not require that the address of a temporary site be indicated on the page of the declaration as a precondition for coverage, and that this should not be implied by reading the Directive as a whole. That finding was motivated by the fact that the terms of a written contract should not be implied if that did not mean an explicit formulation of the treaty. If the temporary location is indicated on the declaration page, there would be coverage in accordance with clause 2.A. It would therefore never be necessary to refer to Article 2.B. In 1941, the insurance industry began to move to the current system, in which the risks covered are first broadly defined in an “All Risk”[16] or “All Sums”[17] insurance agreement on a general form of insurance (e.g.B. “We pay all amounts that the insured is legally required to pay as damages… “), and are then circumscribed by subsequent exclusion clauses (for example.B. “This insurance does not apply to…” »). [18] If the insured wishes to cover a risk taken by exclusion on the standard form, the insured may sometimes pay an additional premium for a confirmation of the policy that suspends the exclusion. The insurance policy is usually an integrated contract, that is, it covers all forms related to the agreement between the insured and the insurer. [2]:10 However, in some cases, additional writings, such as letters sent after the final agreement, may make the insurance policy a non-integrated contract. [2]:11 An insurance booklet states that, in general, “the courts take into account all prior negotiations or agreements.

any contractual clauses in the policy at the time of delivery, as well as those that will then be written as “policy riders” and endorsements. with the agreement of both parties, are part of the written policy.” [3] The manual also states that the Directive must cover all documents that are part of the Directive. [3] Oral agreements are subject to the rule of parol proof and cannot be considered part of the policy if the contract appears to be complete. . . .