The agreement consists of two interconnected documents, both agreed in Belfast on Good Friday, 10 April 1998: (b) Peter Hain (30 January 18): speech in the House of Lords on the European withdrawal law. “No one who truly understands the complexity and dangers of politics on the island of Ireland seriously believes that the opening of the border can be achieved without Northern Ireland remaining in the same internal market and customs union as the Republic of Ireland.” As can be seen, Lord Hain agrees with the ICTU`s view (see above) that “the best and most logical way to avoid a hard border is for the UK as a whole to remain both in the internal market and in the customs union”. (Added February 1018). Another compromise proposal was proposed by Labour. It proposes to remain in the EU customs union or an equivalent customs union and, indeed, it is also in favour of substantial alignment with the internal market, which removes difficult borders in the Irish Sea and throughout Ireland. The DUP has not yet followed this option. Political parties in Northern Ireland, which endorsed the agreement, were also invited to consider the creation of an independent advisory forum, with members of civil society with social, cultural, economic and other expertise, and appointed by both administrations. In 2002, a framework for the North-South Consultation Forum was agreed, and in 2006 the Northern Ireland Executive agreed to support its establishment. Sky News publishes a story (27. February 18) on a letter from Boris Johnson (Foreign Secretary) in which he envisages the return of a hard border – “Even if a hard border is reintroduced, we would expect 95% of goods to cross the border [without] controls.” (Added February 28, 18). The previous text has only four articles; It is this short text that is the legal agreement, but it incorporates the last agreement into its timetables. [7] From a technical point of view, this draft agreement can be distinguished as a multi-party agreement, unlike the Belfast Agreement itself.

[7] The Good Friday Agreement (GFA) or Belfast Agreement (in Irish: Comhaontú Aoine à Chéasta or Comhaontú Bhéal Feirste); Ulster-Scots: Guid Friday Greeance or Bilfawst Greeance), [1] is a pair of agreements reached on the 10th Most of the violence of the Troubles, a political conflict in Northern Ireland since the late 1960s, was signed on 1 April 1998. . .